Online Course Descriptions

ACCT 101 Financial Accounting

3 credits

Fall/Spring

An introduction to fundamental theory, principles and procedures for service and merchandising enterprises with emphasis on such topics as merchandise inventory, plant assets, promissory notes, accounting systems, payroll, internal control, bad debts, adjustments and financial statements. Students may receive one credit or three credits but not both. Students enrolling for one credit will cover approximately one-third of the course.

 

ACCT 103 Managerial Accounting

3 credits

Fall/Spring

This course is designed to meet the needs of internal management in the decision-making process. Emphasis will be on the interpretation of accounting data and approaches to problem solving. Topics covered will include theory and behavior of costs, cost-profit-volume relationships, decision-making, costing systems, and financial statement analysis. Not open to students receiving credit in ACCT102. Prerequisite: ACCT101

 

AGBU 104 Intro Agribusiness & Ag Eco

4 credits

Fall/Spring

This course will comprise studies of the economic framework within which all agribusinesses operate and the nature and scope of the agricultural business complex within the U.S. Economic theory will be used to understand the incentives that dictate producer and consumer behavior in markets and the growing importance of the global marketplace. Within the context of producer behavior, introductory business management principles including functional marketing and marketing costs will be addressed as they relate to firm objectives of profit maximization, cost minimization, and growth.

 

ARTS 125 History of Art II

3 credits

Fall/Spring

A survey of the visual arts from the late Gothic to 20th Century. Lecture and slide presentation.

 

BADM 135 - Retailing

3 credits

Fall/Spring

The study of retail store operations with respect to location, financing, layout, buying, terms of sale, pricing, selling, advertising, sales promotion, customer service, and Federal and State laws which regulate retail operations. Prerequisite: BADM134 or permission of the instructor.

 

BADM 305 International Business

3 credits

Fall/Spring

In-depth exploration of business opportunities and challenges associated with operating in the international business environment. Emphasis is on how social, cultural, economic, legal and political conditions influence decisions made by firms faced with internationalization of its markets. Lectures, discussions, readings, internet problems and case studies will be used. Prerequisite: ECON124 and BADM145 or permission of the instructor.

  

BADM 330 Advertising and Promotion

3 credits

Fall/Spring

This course offers a detailed look at the role of advertising in the marketing mix, with special emphasis on the integrated marketing communications approach with consumers/customers; planning the advertising campaign; media selection; creating and managing advertising; economic, legal and social constraints on advertising for an organization. An evaluation of advertising expenditure from the view of the firm and the consumer are presented. Part of the course requirements is the promotion and media plan for an original product or idea. Prerequisite: BADM134 or permission of the instructor.

 

BADM 349 Strategic Management for Quality

3 credits

Fall

An upper-level course designed to provide the student with background information on Total Quality Management in today's business. Discussion and case work will involve the perspective of total quality, leadership for total quality, restructuring for total quality, the implementation process and total quality in human resources management. Prerequisite: BADM249 or permission of the instructor.

 

BADM 400 Operations Management

3 credits

Fall

A study of the decision-making process and how quantitative methods are used to find solutions to business problems. The computer will be used to analyze and process data. Opportunities, problems and decisions that confront managers are analyzed and solutions are developed. Topics covered include: cost-volume-profit analysis, forecasting, decision theory, linear programming, probability concepts and applications, inventory control, queuing theory and game theory.

 

BADM 449 Management Policy & Issues

3 credits

Spring

The emphasis is on analyzing the criteria for which ultimate business decisions are made; business strategies in international and domestic operations and the impact of political, economic and legal factors. Focus will be given to actual situation analysis and applying current functional and managerial techniques to a variety of case studies. Prerequisite: BADM249 or permission of the instructor.

 

BIOL 101 Introduction to Biology

2 Credits

Fall/Spring

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of biology starting with the molecules that make up life, leading to cells and multi-cellular organisms, and on to populations, ecosystems and human impact. Rather than a detailed exploration of each topic, the course will lead to an understanding of the unifying principals common to all biological species - such as structure and function, homeostasis, metabolism and reproduction - while highlighting the diversity of organisms that make up the web of life. Articles chosen from current events will highlight the application of fundamental concepts to specific topics in health and disease, society and/or the environment. Course fee of $25 is required. Co-requisite: BIOL 101X.

 

CITA 110 Microcomputer Applications I

3 credits

Fall/Spring

An introduction to the use of microcomputers and application software. Topics will include microcomputer terminology, hardware system components, disk operating systems and MS Windows. The student will learn through hands-on experience the skills necessary to use windows-based word processing, spreadsheets and data base systems.

 

CITA 112 Spreadsheet and Database Application

3 credits

Fall/Spring

This course emphasizes the use of advanced concepts in spreadsheet and database applications. Students will gain understanding of concepts and skills required to develop complex business applications. Using software applications such as Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access to store, organize, and retrieve business information that is critical to decision making. Concepts explored include developing complex business models, interaction with other software applications, and using visual programming tools. Prerequisite: Familiarity with Microsoft Windows, Word and Power Point or permission of the instructor. [Fall, Spring] organize, and retrieve business information that is critical to decision making. Concepts explored include developing complex business models, interaction with other software applications, and using visual programming tools. Prerequisite: Familiarity with Microsoft Windows, Word and Power Point or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Familiarity with Microsoft Windows, Word and Power Point or permission of the instructor.

 

CITA 140 Intro to Programming

3 credits

Fall/Spring

A study of fundamental computer terminology, concepts and problem solving techniques.  Emphasis is placed on the development of problem solving skills using a programming language.  Students will write, test and debug programs related to appropriate disciplines using computer equipment. Course fee of $45 is required.

 

CITA 305 JAVA Programming

3 credits

Spring

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the JAVA programming language, its object-oriented features and the main classes required to build useful Java applications and applets. Java has all of the attributes expected of a modern programming language, such as object orientation, multithreading, and a class library for handling facilities such as the graphical user interface and networking. The course includes a thorough grounding in the language, together with important features such as user interface design, exception handling and multithreading. Prerequisite: CITA215 or permission of the department.

 

CITA 330 Web Publishing

3 credits

A comprehensive survey of using HyperText Markup Language (HTML) to create robust and functional Web pages. Topics include: HTML: standards and browser capabilities, information architecture, bandwidth considerations, image formats, image maps, frames, forms and CGIs, and introduction to technologies for creating dynamic content including JavaScript, Java, ActiveX and Active Server Pages. Will also include topics of current interest such as Dynamic HTML and Cascading Style Sheets. Prerequisite: CITA130 or permission of department. Course fee of $45 is required.

 

CITA 420 Programming for the Web

3 credits

Spring

A survey of programming languages and techniques for web development. Topics include CGIs, client side programming with JavaScript; dynamic content using Java and ActiveX; server side programming using Active Server Pages and VBScript; creating dynamic, database driven content; and developing web based client/server database applications. Prerequisite: CITA330 or permission of department.

 

COMM 301 Technical Communication
3 credits
Fall/Spring
Technical communication concentrates on writing for professional situations, as well as upper-level research. It covers research, analysis and presentation of data, form and content of formal and informal reports, letters and resumes. Group work is required, as are presentations. Prerequisites: ENGL101 or ENGL201. This course is intended primarily for bachelor degree students.

 

ECHD 240 Child and Family Wellness

3 credits

Fall/Spring

Students explore a variety of environmental, behavioral, and constitutional factors which influence health dynamics within the family. The role of the teacher/practitioner in observation, prevention, communication, referral and follow up is a strong focus within this course. Topics include: establishing safe environments within children's programs, communicable and non-communicable diseases in children, current options for family health care, children's nutritional needs, and common childhood emergency awareness and care. Current educational focus for teachers includes the effects of drugs, alcohol, tobacco and HIV/AIDS upon children's health. New York State certification will be provided for Child Abuse/Maltreatment Prevention and Violence Prevention and Intervention (S.A.V.E.).

 

ECHD 251 Anti Bias Strategies: A Human Relations Approach

3 credits

Fall/Spring

Students will examine a variety of strategies that promote environments that support emotional and social development from a human perspective. Anti-bias curriculum, media, and materials will be evaluated. The role of conflict resolution strategies in promoting an anti-bias perspective will be explored. This course is primarily interactive and is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

 

ECHD 252 Conflict Resolution

3 credits

Fall/Spring

Conflict exists in society, classrooms, families and ourselves. In this course, students will engage in creative exercises and activities that foster cooperation, personal self-expression, communication, affirmation, mediation and conflict resolution. Students will learn how to prevent conflict and how to use conflict productively for learning.

 

ECHD 280 Exceptional Children

3 credits

Fall/Spring

An introduction to childhood exceptionalities in the disability categories of sensory, health, physical, learning communication, and behavior disorders as well as covering autism, ADHD, traumatic brain injury and giftedness. Definitions, assessment, diagnosis, incidence, causes, instructional strategies, issues, and trends are examined in each category of exceptionality. An overview of laws, policies, and practices with emphasis on Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and placement of students in special education will be covered. In addition, the importance of early intervention, transition, and parental involvement will be discussed.

 

ECHD 351 Families as Partners in Early Childhood Programs

3 credits

Fall/Spring

An examination of the importance of families as partners with early childhood staff in the provision of early care and education for their children. Includes a historical perspective of parent involvement and parent education programs, recognition of parents as the primary educators of their children, and the development of true partnerships as families, teachers, and administrators work together to support and enhance a child's development at home and in school. Prerequisite: ECHD 170 and ECHD 130 or ECHD 190 or permission of the instructor.

 

ECHD 352 Positive Child Guidance

3 credits

Fall/Spring

An examination of the principles and practices consistent with professional guidelines for developmentally appropriate child guidance and classroom management in early care and education programs. Includes discussions and practical experiences related to positive guidance and management strategies for work with groups and with individual children, family involvement, and environment, staffing patterns, scheduling, professional development of staff, conflict resolution and reflective teaching. Prerequiste: ECHD 170 and ECHD 130 or ECHD 190 or permission of the instructor.

 

ECHD 452 Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood

3 credits

Spring

An examination of developmentally appropriate practice in the assessment and evaluation of young children, following the guidelines set by the National Association for the Education of Young Children for authentic assessment and evaluation. Includes practice and using a variety of observation-based data gathering instruments, play-based assessments, trans-disciplinary assessments and portfolios. Also includes discussion of the use and misuse of standardized tests in the assessment and evaluation of young children. Pre-requisite: Early Childhood Practicum or permission of the instructor. This course is for B.S. EC Studies: Birth - Age 5 majors only.

 

ECHD 453 Administration, Supervision, Fin Plng & Mgmt

3 credits

Fall

An overview of existing models of early childhood programs and the specific roles and responsibilities involved in the administration/supervision of these programs. Includes practical experience with program planning and implementation. Prerequisite: 60 credits, 18 credits of which must be in Early Childhood. Must have earned a grade of "B" or better in Early Childhood Practicum course. This course is for B.S. Child Care and Development majors only.

 

ECHD 454 Operation Management & Childrens Programs

3 credits

Spring

Systems theory and practical applications related to operations management and policy development in quality programs for children and families: enrollment and retention of children and families. Record keeping, technology and communication systems, health and safety policies and procedures, program accreditation and space allocation and maintenance. Prerequisite: ECHD 453, 60 credits, of which 18 must be in Early Childhood. Must have earned a grade of "B" or better in Early Childhood Practicum course. This course is for B.S. Child Care and Development majors only.

 

ECHD 456 External Environment & Childrens Programs

3 credits

Fall/Spring

An examination of the legal and regulatory requirements for children's programs at local, state and federal levels; marketing strategies and customer relationships; ethical issues; community resources for children and families; advocacy issues and activities; career development in the field of early childhood. Included experiences with practical applications of the principles and practices discussed. Prerequisite: ECHD453, 60 college credits, 18 of which must be in Early Childhood. Must have earned a grade of "B" or better in Early Childhood Practicum course. This course is for B.S. Child Care and Development majors only.

 

ECHD 460 Internship in Early Childhood

8 credits

Fall/Spring

The internship is the culminating experience in the bachelor's program. It focuses on the integration and application of the concepts and skills acquired in courses and field experiences during the first three years of the program. The internship is planned by the student and faculty advisor, to meet the student's specific career goals. This experience may involve supervisory or administrative responsibilities, advocacy, program planning, classroom teaching, partnership with families, collaboration among the community agencies around the needs of young children and families, or other related areas as approved. As settings for internships, students may choose child care/preschool/Head Start Programs; pre-kindergarten/kindergarten public school placements; child life programs in hospitals; early intervention programs; community agencies or other approved early care and education related settings. Students will prepare a comprehensive report and professional portfolio as a requirement of ECHD 461. Prerequisite: Senior year standing, GPS of 2.5 or higher.

 

ECHD 461 Internship Reporting

4 credits

Fall/Spring

ECHD 461, Internship Reporting, is a four-credit course taken simultaneously with ECHD 460, Internship. ECHD461 is designed for students to engage in research, problem solving, discussion and reflection and to document their academic and professional growth through the internship. The main goal of the course is to maximize student learning while working in the field and to ensure the internship is a sound academic experience. Students complete an internship project, portfolio, and a final presentation for members of the College community. Students earn a letter grade for this course. Prerequisite: Senior year standing, GPA of 2.5 or higher.

 

ECON 124 Macro-Economics

3 credits

Fall/Spring

An introduction to the operation of the modern national economy including: analysis of national output, income employment, business fluctuations, money and banking.

 

ECON 330 Comparative Economic System

3 credits

An analysis of capitalism, the mixed economy, and socialism; the ways in which economic activities are organized; the role of monetary and financial institutions; management practices; allocation of resources among competing goals; role of economic planning; and the role of industry and agriculture.  A detailed comparative study of Japan, China, Yugoslavia, the Soviet Union and the United States.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the process of furthering economic growth by studying successful and unsuccessful development strategies. Prerequisite: ECON 123 or ECON 124 or AGBU 103 or its equivalent.

 

ENGL 101 Composition I

3 credits

Fall/Spring

In this composition course, students will write personal essays developing a point or an idea with evidence drawn from their own lives and academic essays organized around an intellectual task, such as arguing in favor of an idea, comparing, defining or analyzing. A student must demonstrate competency in (1) organizing and paragraphing, (2) clarity of main point, (3) appropriateness, logic and specificity of development, (4) maturity of content, and (5) sentence structure, grammar, spelling, and punctuation. This course will include an introductory research component. Prerequisite: Placement or a grade of "C" of higher in ENGL 099

 

ENGL 241 Short Story

3 credits

Fall/Spring

Reading and discussion of representative examples of the short story form, with emphasis on response, interpretation and appreciation.  Evaluation will be based upon such factors as class participation, tests including essay questions, and written assignments.

 

ENGL 310 Selected Topics in Literature

3 credits

Fall/Spring

The course will explore, in depth, a particular literary issue, period or genre.  Themes of the course will change each semester in which it is offered and will be announced prior to registration. Prerequisite: ENGL 219, ENGL 221, or ENGL 223

 

ENGL 316 Readings in Native American Literature
3 credits
Fall/Spring
This course is a study of the literature of the indigenous peoples of North America and considers the following: prevalent themes, language use, the effect of contact with European culture, and the cultural values and experiences expressed in the work. Class methodology will include readings, lecture, discussion, tests and written exploration and critique of the literature. Prerequisites: ENGL101 and one lower-level literature or writing course, or permission of the instructor. Either NAMS111 or NAMS121 highly recommended.

 

ENGL 320 Writing Nature: Human Expression and the Natural World
3 credits
Fall/Spring
This course is designed to introduce the student to the genre of Nature Writing. Against the backdrop of a variety of readings in the genre, consideration of other art forms, as well as theoretical writings on the relationship of humankind to the environment, students will explore their own relationship with the natural world through writing spontaneous, observational and theoretical pieces as well as developing a project in their artistic medium. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or other introductory writing course except ENGL 099

 

HIST 122 History of the United States II
3 credits
Fall/Spring
An investigation of the political, economic and social development of the United States. The course begins with Reconstruction and moves to the 1990s.

 

HUMS 310 Selected Topics Humanities

3 credits

This course will explore, in depth, a particular issue in humanities.  Themes of the course will change each semester in which it is offered and will be announced prior to registration.

 

MATH 111 College Algebra
3 credits
Fall/Spring
A course in Algebra for college students with a strong emphasis on problem-solving and applications. Topics include: introduction to functions and their graphs; linear and quadratic functions; solution of a variety of types of equations and inequalities using algebraic, numeric and graphical techniques; systems of equations, operations with polynomials; rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic expressions; and exponential functions. Use of a graphing calculator may be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: placement per high school transcript, completion of MATH101 or MATH101X with "C-" or higher, or by permission of the Mathematics Department.

 

MATH 112 College Algebra & Trigonometry

3 credits

Fall/Spring

A study of functions and their properties and applications from algebra and trigonometry. Topics include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Use of a graphing calculator may be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Placement per high school transcript - three units of high school math including at least some work in Course III, Math B, Algebra II, or their equivalent is recommended, MATH111, or by permission of the Mathematics Department.

 

MATH 125 Statistics (C)
3 credits
Fall/Spring
A basic course in general statistics with applications in the fields of business and the natural, behavioral and social sciences. Elementary probability theory and descriptive statistics are introduced, but the emphasis is on inferential statistics including significance tests, confidence intervals, and linear regression and correlation. Prerequisite: placement per high school transcript, MATH111 or above, or by permission of the Mathematics Department.

 

MATH 131 Pre-Calculus
4 credits
Fall/Spring
A course designed to provide the necessary foundation for a standard calculus course. The focus of pre-calculus is the concept of a function with special emphasis on graphing functions. Topics include types of functions, graphing techniques, properties and graphs of polynomials and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions. A graphing calculator may be required. Not recommended for students with four units of high school mathematics. Not open to students with credit for Calculus I except by permission of the Mathematics Department. Prerequisite: Three units of high school mathematics including NYS Course III or NYS Math B, or MATH112, or by permission of the Mathematics Department.

 

MATH 225 Statistical Methods 
3 credits
Fall/Spring
A review of basic statistical concepts, probability concepts, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling techniques and sampling distributions, point estimation, interval estimation, testing statistical hypotheses, analysis of variance, basic design of experiments, simple and multiple regression, analysis of covariance, nonparametric techniques, analysis for categorical data. Prerequisite: MATH125 or its equivalent with a minimum grade of "C."

 

MATH 231 Calculus I
4 credits
Fall/Spring
A course in plane analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, differentiation and anitdifferentiation of algebraic, trigonometric and exponential functions of a single variable with applications. An introduction to definite integrals is included. A graphing calculator as well as a computer algebra system (MAPLE) may be used. Prerequisite: Four units of high school regents mathematics including pre-calculus, MATH131 ("C" or better), or by permission of the Mathematics Department.

 

MKTH 311 E-Marketing
3 credits
Fall/Spring
E-Marketing is a major component of electronic commerce, the fastest growing area of business. As such, workers and students with expertise in this field are in great demand. This course provides an introduction to the field and explains the various roles of E-Marketing in an organization's total marketing program. Students will be trained how to specifically use the internet and related technology to strategize and implement research, advertising, merchandising, customer service and other marketing mix-related functions. This is a practical, hands-on course. It explores Internet technologies as products in and of themselves, as mass and personal communications tools, and as a distribution/transaction channel. It will also address user characteristics and behavior, direct marketing and online strategies for relationship marketing. The basics of Web design will be introduced. Prerequisite: HOTL205 or BADM134

 

NAMS 121 Intro to Native American Studies I
3 credits
Fall/Spring
The course is intended to provide students with an introduction to Native American Societies in the present-day U.S. from prior to the arrival of Europeans until U.S. independence. As a survey course, students will be introduced to social structures, political structures, spiritual practices, and inter-tribal/nation relations. Focus will be on the tribal nations of the Northwest, the Great Plains, and the Southwest. The course will also deal with the arrival of Spanish, British, and French colonizers and the impacts that they had -- along with the emergent U.S. -- on native nations.

 

NAMS 122 Intro to Native American Studies II
3 credits
Spring
The course is intended to provide students with an introduction to Native American Societies in the present- day U.S. from the life and death struggles in the first century of the American Republic, through various government programs that sought to destroy natives' way of life, to the resurgence of native nations with the 1970's. The course will focus on the survival stories of native peoples who defended their ways of life against the U.S. onslaught and reached a point in the 21st century of being flourishing communities dealing with modern challenges while maintaining traditional perspectives.

 

NTRN 122 Nutrition
3 credits
Fall/Spring
A study of the macro and micro nutrient requirements of individuals coupled with a study of the food composition with the goal of understanding how diet choices influence health. Nutrition needs for the life cycle, especially in infancy and childhood will be presented. Students will have an opportunity to evaluate food choices in the context of nutrition requirements using appropriate computer software.

 

PHED 151 Wellness

1 credit

Fall/Spring

A course designed to assess the many areas of lifestyle choices and their relationship to an individual's health and wellness. The course will encourage regular physical activity through two 4-week blocks of participation in areas that include: lifetime sports, net sports, outdoor education and fitness, nutrition/weight management, stress reduction, mental health, injury prevention, cancer, substance abuse and abuse, sexually transmitted disease, overweight/obesity, the rise in chronic disease, alcohol, and risks associated with tobacco use.

 

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
3 credits
Fall
A course designed to introduce students to philosophy both as a subject for study and as an activity of the human mind. Basic philosophic questions and problems will be surveyed and explored, and the significant approaches and orientations to these questions and problems will be examined and evaluated. The student will be encouraged to question, analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and to develop the critical and reflective attitude of mind that is basic to philosophic thinking.

 

PSYC 111 General Psychology
3 credits
Fall/Spring
Consideration of the methods and points of view involved in the scientific study of the psycho-physical basis of human behavior with emphasis on maturation, intelligence, development, learning, motivation, personality and individual differences.

 

PSYC 300 Intro to Community Psychology

3 credits

Fall

This course is designed to be an introductory course in community psychology. While the focus will be on the research strategies and strategies that promote community change, this course will also explore community psychology's core values and assumptions. Prerequisite: PSYC111

 

PSYC 341 Organizational Psychology

3 credits

Fall

A study of the changing structure and purpose of the organizations and the impact of these changes on individual and interpersonal changes. Prerequisite: PSYC111

 

PSYC 410 Advanced Research Methods

3 credits

Fall/Spring

This course will expand the knowledge gained in PSYC 250 (Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences) and take the topics into greater depth. This course will focus more on program development and evaluation, drawing from the knowledge gained in PSYC 250. Emphasis will be on methods of evaluation and research design, instrument development, data collection techniques within a public/applied setting. This course will help the student to learn the methods of program design and evaluation, and additionally, apply these methods to appropriate settings. At the conclusion of this course, students will have completed an original evaluation research project in conjunction with work at the internship site. Prerequisites: Majors only; 2.5 overall GPA. Corequisite: PSYC 470

 

SOSC 311 Rural Sociology

3 credits

Fall/Spring

This course will use the sociological perspective in the study of rural communities. The course will examine the characteristics of rural areas as well as the social institutions of rural America. Demographic changes and their impact on the rural community will be examined. Social problems in rural areas will be studied. A major part of the course will concentrate on research using archival data, research from land grant colleges and other agencies studying rural America. A requirement of the course is 20 hours of volunteer work for a community agency, accompanied by a research paper on the agency. Prerequisite: None for B.T. students; SOSC111 or SOSC112 for Associate Degree students.

 

SUST 101 Introduction to Sustainability

3 credits

Fall/Spring

This introductory course examines the multifaceted concept of sustainability in the world. During the semester, students will analyze approximately two dozen topics related to sustainability. Topics may include animal rights, pollution, clean water, environmental justice, global warming, agriculture, energy, land use, population, consumption, and transportation. The instructor will present a broad spectrum of historical and theoretical perspective to help students better understand our changing natural world. Students will review and analyze historic, classic, and contemporary studies about the environment. Concepts of a sustainable society will concentrate on theories, problems, and solution. The course will include a significant amount of reading as well as the application of a written research project.

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